New Medal Groups

PHOTOS DESCRIPTION

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Pair: A Great War 1916 ‘Somme’ M.M. pair awarded to Private O. M. Selig, 13th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, a battalion runner who worked for 48 hours without rest, and was continually exposed to sniper and shell fire. He was wounded in action, 17 May 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (3917. Pte. O. M. Selig. 13/Aust: Inf:); British War Medal 1914-20 (3917 Pte. O. M. Selig. 13 Bn. A.I.F.)

M.M. London Gazette 8 December 1916. The original recommendation states:

‘For bravery and devotion to duty during the operations N.W. of Pozieres 29th/31st August. He was a battalion runner and worked for 48 hours without rest and was continually exposed to the greatest danger from shells and snipers. His courage and devotion to duty are very highly recommended.’

O. M. Selig was born in Dungoy, near Maitland, New South Wales, Australia, in 1892. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force, 30 August 1915, and embarked for Egypt, in December 1915. Selig served with the 13th Australian Infantry Battalion as part of the 4th Australian Brigade, 4th Australian Division in the French theatre of war from June 1916.

Selig was awarded his M.M. for gallantry in operations on the Somme, in particular during attacks north west of Pozieres 29/31 August 1916. The Battalion War Diary for these dates records an attack on Mouquet Farm. During the latter the Battalion suffered 8 other ranks killed, 3 officers and 42 other ranks wounded.

Selig continued to serve with the Battalion in France, and was wounded in action, 17 May 1918. He was invalided to England a few days later, and returned to Australia in the H.T. Marathon. Selig was discharged 21 March 1919.

 

Both suspension claws re-pinned, nearly very fine $2950

 

Trio: A Great War 1918 ‘Somme’ M.M. group of three awarded to Corporal A. E. Boyd, 37th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, for continued gallantry as a stretcher bearer over a three week period in August 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (2222 Pte. - T. Cpl. - A. E. Boyd. 37/Aust: Inf:); British War and Victory Medals (2222 Cpl. A. E. Boyd 37 Bn. A.I.F.)

M.M. London Gazette 29 March 1919. The original recommendation states:


‘On the night of the 9th/10th August 1918, Corporal Boyd, who was then a stretcher bearer, did consistently good work getting out wounded men. During this operation, he was continuously under heavy artillery and machine gun fire, and was working until late in the morning. At Proyart 12th August, Bray 24th August, Suzanse 26th August, Howitzer Wood 29th August, Clery 30th August, he continued to do good work showing a total disregard for personal danger and endurance and courage of a remarkably high standard. When wanted he was always on the job and apart from his personal work was invaluable in directing the work of other stretcher bearers of B Company. Corporal Boyd has proved himself a splendid and dauntless leader under the most trying and perilous circumstances.’

A. E. Boyd was born in Yarrawonga, Victoria, Australia. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force, in January 1916. Boyd embarked for the UK on the S.S. Shropshire, and travelled on to France, 15 February 1917. He served with the 37th Australian Infantry Battalion as part of the 10th Australian Brigade, 3rd Australian Division in the French theatre of war.

Boyd was awarded his M.M. for gallantry as stretcher bearer in operations on the Somme, over a three week period in August 1918. The Battalion War Diary for this month records the 37th Battalion suffering casualties of 4 officers (including the CO) and 34 other ranks killed, 12 officers and 257 other ranks wounded, and one officer and 14 other ranks died of wounds.

Boyd continued to serve with the Battalion in France, and was wounded in action. He returned to Australia in the S.S Nestor, 20 May 1919, and was discharged 9 August 1919. Boyd died in November 1956.

 

Minor edge bruising overall, therefore very fine $3750

 

Pair: A Great War 1918 ‘Somme’ M.M. pair awarded to Private P. O’Sullivan, 44th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, for single-handedly capturing a machine-gun, an officer and 20 men, during an attack on Hamel, 4 July 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (61 Pte. P. O’Sullivan. 44/Aust: Inf:); British War Medal 1914-20 (61 Pte. P. O’Sullivan  44 Bn. A.I.F.)

M.M. London Gazette 1 October 1918. The original recommendation states:

‘On the 4th July 1918 during the attack on Hamel, this man on reaching the final objective saw an enemy machine gun being mounted for action. He immediately rushed forward, bombed and killed the crew and captured the gun. He then bombed the adjacent dugout and captured an Officer and 20 men. During the whole of this operation this man showed conspicuous bravery and set a very high example of devotion to duty to his comrades.’

P. O’Sullivan was born in Warren Island, County Kerry, Ireland. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force, 10 January 1916, and embarked for France on H.M.A.T. Suevic, 6 June 1916. O’Sullivan served with the 44th Australian Infantry Battalion as part of the 11th Australian Brigade, 3rd Australian Division in the French theatre of war. He was awarded his M.M. for gallantry in operations on the Somme, in particular during the attack on Hamel, 4 July 1918. During the attack on Hamel, 12 German officers and 350 other ranks were captured, together with 20 machine-guns. O’Sullivan’s battalion suffered 22 other ranks killed, 5 officers and 113 other ranks wounded, and 13 other ranks missing.

O’Sullivan returned to Australia in H.T. Plassy in September 1919, and was discharged 10 December 1919.

Note: The BWM was re-united recently (2018) giving hope that the Victory Medal will eventually turn up

 

Very fine $3250

 

 

Trio: A Great War 1918 ‘Somme’ M.M. group of three awarded to Private C. Wells, 47th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, for gallantry as a Runner at Dernancourt, 5 April 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (5208 Pte. C. Wells. 47/Aust: Inf:); British War and Victory Medals (5208 Pte. C. Wells. 47-Bn. A.I.F.)

 

M.M. London Gazette 16 July 1918. The original recommendation states:

‘At Dernancourt, south west of Albert 5th April 1918, Wells acted as a runner and did some splendid work. He showed great determination in getting his messages through heavy artillery and machine gun fire. When passing the Battalion Headquarters with a message, he was wounded, but delivered his message. His grit was very fine and was an example to all the men.’

C. Wells was born in Brisbane, Australia, in 1891. He enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force, in November 1915. He embarked for Egypt on H.M.A.T. Star of Victoria, in March 1916, and travelled on to France on the H.T. Hunstpill, in June 1916. Wells served with the 47th Australian Infantry Battalion as part of the 12th Australian Brigade, 4th Australian Division in the French theatre of war from July 1916.

Wells was awarded his M.M. for gallantry in operations on the Somme, in particular at Dernancourt, 5 April 1918. The Battalion War Diary for this date records that the attack was successful, with the 47th Battalion suffering casualties of 3 officers and 22 other ranks killed, 2 officers and 85 other ranks wounded.

Wells continued to serve with the Battalion in France, and was hospitalised suffering from ‘lumbago, debility and trench fever.’ He returned to Australia in the S.S Commonwealth, 11 February 1919, and was discharged 28 July 1919.

 

Generally very fine $3850

 

Trio: A Great War 1918 ‘Somme’ M.M. group of three awarded to Private C. McCabe, 55th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, for continued acts of gallantry over a 11 month period in 1918, in particular during the Spring Offensive, and at Peronne, 1 September 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (5418 Pte. C. McCabe. 55/Aust: Inf:); British War and Victory Medals (5418 Pte. C. McCabe. 55 - Bn. A.I.F.)

M.M. London Gazette 20 August 1919. The original recommendation states:

‘For continued gallantry and devotion to duty during the period 25th February 1918 to 31st December 1918. During these periods Pte. McCabe was a member of his Company permanent patrol and many were his acts of gallantry and devotion to duty indicating an utter disregard of personal safety. Whilst the Battalion was in the line north of Villiers Bretonneux during the months of April and May 1918, his work was marked and won for him the admiration and confidence of all with whom he was associated. During the operations at Peronne on 1st September 1918, his coolness and energy under heavy fire so cheered and inspired his comrades that the operation was helped to a great degree by his personal example.’

 

Generally very fine or better $3750

 

 

Trio: A Great War 1917 ‘Ypres’ M.M. group of three awarded to Private A. Delury, 25th Australian Infantry Battalion, Australian Imperial Force, who received a shrapnel wound to the right shoulder in the process of winning the M.M., and was later gassed 12 May 1918

Military Medal, G.V.R. (4797 Pte. A. Delury. 25/Aust: Inf:); British War and Victory Medals (4797 Sgt. A. Delury. 25-Bn. A.I.F.)

M.M. London Gazette 12 December 1917. The original recommendation states:

‘At Westhoek Ridge 20th September 1917 for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, when despite heavy shell fire he laid out telephone wires to the front line, and by repairing continual breaks, consequent upon enemy shell fire, he maintained communications throughout.’

A. Delury was born in Woolwich, Kent, in 1893. He was employed as a Well Borer prior to his enlistment in the Australian Imperial Force, in January 1916. Delury served with the 25th Australian Infantry Battalion as part of the 7th Australian Brigade, 2nd Australian Division in the French theatre of war from November 1916.

Delury was awarded his M.M. for gallantry in operations at Ypres, in particular during the attack on Westhoek Ridge, 20/21 September 1917. The Battalion War Diary for this date records that all objectives were taken and consolidated, with the 25th Battalion suffering casualties of one officer and 32 other ranks killed, one officer and 9 other ranks died of wounds, 3 officers and 135 other ranks wounded and 4 other ranks missing. Delury was amongst the Battalion’s wounded for that day, having suffered a shrapnel wound to the right shoulder.

Delury continued to serve with the Battalion in France, and was gassed, 12 May 1918. He returned to Australia in the H.M.A.T. Border, 9 December 1919, and was discharged ‘medically unfit’ 27 April 1920.

 

Generally very fine or better $3750

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Pair: British war medal and Victory medal impressed to 3052 PTE T. McCAULEY 10 BN AIF

Emb. 14th September 1915

Transferred to the 50th Bn (26th February 1916)

Transferred to the Australian Army Medical Corps officially the 6th March 1919 but parading with unit from the 2nd November 1918

Discharged 4th military district 13th August 1919 Medically unfit 

Note: Entitled to 1914/15 star, however the pair was re-united recently (2018) giving hope that the 1914/15 Star will eventually turn up. A note that came with medal indicates he died in 1930 with the official records stating “died after discharge”.

VF+ $375

 

 

Trio: Private P. S. Smith, 25th Battalion, Australian Imperial Force

1914-15 Star (234 Pte. P. S. Smith. 25/Bn A.I.F.); British War and Victory Medal (234 Pte. P. S. Smith. 25 Bn. A.I.F.)

Percival Sydney Smith was born in 1878 and attested for the Australian Imperial Force at Brisbane on 28 January 1915. He served with the 25th Battalion at Gallipoli from August 1915, and on the Western Front from 1916. He was wounded in action with a gunshot wound on 2 September 1918 and was invalided to Weymouth Hospital. He was discharged on 18 January 1919, and died on 29 July 1950.

 

Lacquered, good very fine $975

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Single: SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL1853 impressed to JOHN HALPIN, 74TH REGT

John Halpin was born 1822 in Limerick, Tipperary, Ireland joining the 74th Regiment (number 1766) on the 22nd February 1840, at the age of 18. John saw service in the 3rd Kaffir war of 1850-53 with his unit the 74th Highland Regiment. In 1864 after 20 years of service and in receipt of a pension he migrated to Sydney NSW along with his five children on board “The Queen of the East”. His wife was not aboard but was noted as already living in the colony; John’s occupation was listed as Shoemaker and soldier.

Good, fine SOLD

 

 

Single: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two claspsRhodesia, Relief of Mafeking impressed to 25 Cpl: W. H. Davis. S. Rhod: Vols:

Partially corrected, with the rank additionally re-engraved, edge bruising, VF $1500

 

Single: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, two clasps Talana, Defence of Ladysmith” impressed to 9327 Pte. O. Thatcher. K.R.R.C.

 

Thatcher served with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps in South Africa during the Boer War, and was invalided on 24 April 1900.

 

Nearly extremely fine $875

 

Single: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, three claspsElandslaagte, Defence of Ladysmith, Belfast” impressed to 3802 Pte. O. Pritchard, Manchester Regt.

Two edge bruises, otherwise nearly extremely fine $985

 

Single: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, four clasps “Cape Colony, Wepener, Transvaal, Wittebergen” impressed to 891 Pte. E. Whitehead. Kaffrn: Rifles

 

Provenance: Buckland Dix and Wood, November 1991.

 

Minor edge nicks, about extremely fine $1350

 

Single: Queen’s South Africa 1899-1902, eight clasps, “Belmont, Modder River, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, SA 1901” impressed to 784 M. Lally, Cldstm: Gds:

Michael Lally was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1875 and attested for the Coldstream Guards there on 9 February 1897, having previously served in the 4th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. He served with the Guards in South Africa during the Boer War from 21 October 1899 until 23 December 1901, before transferring to the Army Reserve on 4 November 1902. He was discharged on 8 February 1909, after 12 years’ service.

On the outbreak of the Great War Lally re-enlisted into the York and Lancaster Regiment on 5 August 1914, and served with the 3rd Battalion in Gallipoli from 12 October 1915. He was evacuated to Egypt on 20 December 1915, arriving there on 3 February 1916.

 

Minor marks, otherwise good very fine $2200

 

 

Passport photo of Thomas McConville and his wife

Four: R.Q.M.S. Thomas McConville M.S.M. Royal Irish Fusiliers

1914-15 Star (14516 SJT T. McCONVILLE. R. IR. FUS); British War (14516 SJT T. McCONVILLE. R. IR. FUS); VICTORY MEDAL (14516 SJT C. McCONVILLE. R. IR. FUS); Meritorious Service Medal, G.V.R., 1st issue (14516 C.Q.M. SJT T.  McCONVILLE 9/R. IR. FUS). There is a minor initial error on the Victory Medal, but all surrounding information including service number is the same.

M.S.M. London Gazette 18 January 1919.

Thomas McConville was born on the 9th August 1895 in Co. Armagh, Northern Ireland and enlisted with the Royal Irish Fusiliers in 1915, serving with the 9th Battalion (Lurgan) during the Great War. A Genealogy extract on Lurgan has his final rank as Regimental Quartermaster showing the following “McConville, Thomas, 120, Victoria Street, R.Q.M.S., 9th R.I.F., M.S.M”. He and his wife along with their baby daughter migrated to Australia in 1926.

 

Nearly extremely fine $780